Monday, 5 October 2009

Revolution -Marcia Russell -TVNZ - NZ OnScreen - all episodes

NZ OnScreen
Today, NZ OnScreen put online the other three epsodes of the award winning series, Revolution, This four part series mapped sweeping social and economic change in New Zealand society in the 1980s and early 1990s.

Described as a “journalist's assembly” by its makers, it collected together interviews with the major players and archive footage.

“We wanted to make Revolution because we believed that unless we re-run and re-examine our recent history we are in constant danger of forgetting, and forgetting can render us passive about the present and slaves of the future.” [Marcia Russell - Producer]

It won Best Factual Series at the 1997 Film and TV Awards" See also the book of the series, Revolution, published by Hodder Moa Beckett, 1996
Abe Books, here . Library, here, via Worldcat




The Grand Illusion - Episode Two
This second episode argues that in its first term in office, the Labour Government promoted neoliberal reform via illusory ideas of consensus and fairness, while PM David Lange mined goodwill from its anti-nuclear policy. The interviews include key figures in politics, the public service and business. There are recollections of an age of easy lending and yuppie excess, while those in rural areas recall the downside of job losses.

Episode Three





The Great Divide - Episode Three
This third episode looks at the lurch of the Kiwi stock market from boom to bust in 1987, and the growing philosophical divide between “head boys” PM David Lange and finance minister Roger 'Rogernomics' Douglas. Within two months of the October 1987 stock market crash, $21 billion was lost from the value of NZ shares. Lange and Douglas give accounts of how their differing views on steering the NZ economy eventually resulted in both their resignations.
 



 


The New Country - Episode Four
This final episode sums up, after examining “the second wave” of neoliberal reform when National took power in 1990 shortly after Telecom was sold to American interests. Incoming finance minister Ruth “mother of all budgets” Richardson oversaw a reduction of welfare payments, a shake-up of the health system, and a curbing of union powers. Richardson: "in a human sense I understood that [community outrage], but that wasn’t going to deflect me".

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Note: Revolution Episode One
In August , 2009, I posted on the original episode of this seminal account of the transition of  New Zealand from a heavily regulated command economy to the darling of the free enterpirse, The Economist. As is know, the reality took some geting used to. This series is a timely reminder to that enthusiasm, and of recent attempts to revist what some keep calling, 'unfinished business' Roger Douglas is now back in Parliament. David Lange died in August, 2005.

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